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The Social Side of Enterprise

Why Social Entrepreneurship Means More than Just a Bottom Line

Social entrepreneurs identify resources where people only see problems. They view the villagers as the solution, not the passive beneficiary. They begin with the assumption of competence and unleash resources in the communities they’re serving.”

– David Bornstein, author of How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas

In this week’s Crush It Report, we are going to discuss a HOT new topic on the entrepreneurship front: social entrepreneurship. You may or may not have heard of this, but the idea is pretty straightforward: social problems can be tackled in similar ways to business problems.

Social Entrepreneurs Have a Greater Purpose than Profits

Whether it be working to resolve an environmental issue or social injustice, social entrepreneurs apply business solutions to social problems. The up-and-coming entrepreneurs of today are much more socially aware than their predecessors. Social entrepreneurship used to be an oxy-moron.

Now it’s anything but that.

Even business schools are starting to offer programs in social entrepreneurship. Hult Business School in London is one of the first, with many other schools across the world planning to follow their lead. Their goal is to appeal to students’ conscience, not wallets.

In an age of ever-increasing corporate social responsibility and   proactive environmental actions, knowledge of social enterprise just may be the new path to success.

Our vending business is a prime example of a social enterprise. Of course, you need to make money. But once that’s under control, you can work towards your bigger mission. Ours is about  fighting obesity by increasing access to healthy foods, drinks, and education. Like we always say, we are a health and nutrition company with a vending problem.

The bottom line: If you see a problem, find the resources to solve it. It’s simply business with a social mission.

Best in Health,

Sean & Andy

Founders, HUMAN Healthy Vending

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Childhood Obesity: America’s Got a BIG Problem

Check out this creative video on the childhood obesity epidemic:

You’ll learn some startling facts about childhood obesity, including…

1. 1/3 of children in America are either overweight or obese

2.  19.6% of kids ages 6 to 11 are unhealthy (compared to 6.5% in 1980)

3.  Obesity in children can lead to diabetes, stroke, cancer, and more

You definitely need to watch this.

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Recognized for Success

Co-Founder Andy Mackensen Featured in Stanford Business Magazine

This week, Andy Mackensen, co-founder of HUMAN Healthy Vending and Stanford ’06 alum, appeared in the Stanford Business Magazine Spring 2011 issue.

Andy was recognized for his unique and innovative take on the vending industry. HUMAN machines are 30-50% more energy efficient than older models, not to mention stocked with healthy food and drink options.

His experience in the hot food vending industry lead him to found HUMAN with Sean Kelly. They capitalized on technological innovation and their passion for health.

Congrats, Andy!

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skelly

Biomedical Engineer who earned his degree from The Johns Hopkins University & Columbia University. Named one of Forbes’ Top 30 Under 30 in 2013. Co-Founded America’s first Pure Play healthy vending company in 2003.
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